Art During the Pandemic

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An artists takes time to paint flowers. (Photo/Sincerely Media/Unsplash)

Hellen Jin, Online Staff Writer

Many student artists have been spending their time during quarantine nurturing their art abilities. While the world was facing many challenges due to COVID-19 these passionate artists have worked tirelessly to improve upon their talents . .

 Granted with the gift of extra time due to the pandemic, Senior Annie Zhang spent her time exploring different forms of art. She noted, “I’ve been working in my sketchbook a lot and the focus for me has been trying things that are kind of out of my comfort zone, so experimenting with a new style or trying to draw things I am not used to drawing such as landscapes.” Although Zhang did not get the chance to work on any major art projects, , she ultimately used the time to explore her passions. “I also decided to  explore different mediums of art, like different painting mediums, using clay, and making clothes,” said Zhang.  

Not only did many artistic students, like Zhang, cultivate their passions, but some have even discovered a way to use their artistic knowledge to give back to their communities. Juniors Emily Zhu and Sophie Zhang decided to make a cello-piano collab album during quarantine. Many of us probably saw the Schoology post of the album Emily and Sophie worked tirelessly on, and the beautiful music delivered happiness and joy to many during a period when high spirits are hard to come by. “We believe that music can provide hope in rough times, and that drove us to make our album, dedicated to those struggling with the pandemic. We hoped that our album would lift the spirit of everyone listening while isolated in quarantine,” said Sophie when asked what inspired her and Emily to create an album. However, they also encountered a few challenges in the process of making this album. For example, they were unable to meet each other in person to practice, so they were forced to keep all their work on a digital platform. Eventually though, they persevered and made a beautiful and inspiring album. 

Sophomore Kyler Zhou has similarly been using his musical talent as a way to give back to his community. “Over the summer, I started Virtuoso Piano Camp to raise money for local businesses that are suffering during the pandemic, as well as for charity to help people in need,” he stated. For him, the overall experience was, “rewarding because we had the opportunity to teach and connect with younger kids, and we used our musical talent to spread joy and give back to our community.” 

Many more student artists, both within and outside of the PDS community, have taken part in artistic activities which either cultivated their self growth or helped their community. Despite the challenges we face from not being able to maintain a normal schedule, those who continue to create art of any sort bring hope and life to those around them.

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