Do Students Prefer Synchronous or Asynchronous Classes?

Synchronous Meetings (Photo/ TalentLMS)

Synchronous Meetings (Photo/ TalentLMS)

Ritika Kumar, Online Arts Editor

Recently, PDS switched its policy so that each class holds a “synchronous” meeting at least once a cycle. The reason for the switch is so that teachers can check in with students and so that students can feel more connected to the PDS community. Still, many people are a little wary of the change in policy. Are synchronous classes really helping students? 

While PDS is implementing various methods to include a bit of the PDS community in online learning, a popular belief among students is that asynchronous classes are the way to go. “I was just getting used to being able to plan out my day and get my work done and now I keep feeling like it’s hard to figure out where I’m supposed to be”, states Junior Maya Shah. Like Shah says, it can be difficult keeping up with the alarms and reminders for Google Meets. “I don’t really feel a difference yet. It’s weird sometimes though because if you’re in a class that is usually pretty quiet, it’s just more awkward on google meet,” mentions sophomore Sanjana Paramesh. “Being at home means that some classes wouldn’t work for the times they are scheduled for,” says junior Gunnar Clingman. Adding on to Clingman, junior Camille Scordis states that “[Asynchronous class] allows me to stick with my own schedule.” Many synchronous classes aren’t useful for students because there is a required amount of time that teachers need to spend with each of their classes. 

Still, we can’t forget about the most beneficial part of having synchronous classes: it allows us to connect. “I like synchronous classes. I get to see more of my friends and it forces me to start my work before 7:59 p.m,” mentions junior Nikita Bhardwaj. When we are at home, it is easy to procrastinate, and the implementation of online learning forces us to finish our work once and for all. “I like synchronous classes because it’s nice to see people and talk,” explains junior Gaby Namouni. Synchronous classes can be a great way to communicate with other people, which is nearly impossible to do nowadays.

I think there are many benefits to asynchronous learning. Some people look forward to doing work because they are bored with Netflix and DisneyPlus, and others care enough about their academics to not slack off. Sometimes, it is tough to keep up with work when a class has an online Google Meet and also expects students to do additional individual work. Some of my teachers don’t give individual work for the synchronous class days, and this seems to be the perfect balance. I am learning more outside of synchronous class time, but I still enjoy having a quick check-in with my teacher and seeing all my friends.

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